Glossary

AJAX progress indicator
(clear)
  • Throw-ShuttleSee flying shuttle.
  • Tie-DyeSee resist-dyeing, plangi.
  • TikarA plaited sitting mat offered to visitors.
  • TreadleA bar pressed by the foot, used (for example) to raise a heddle or to depress a shed stick during weaving. Synonym: pedal.
  • Treadle LoomA loom equipped with treadle(s).
  • Triple ClothA compound weave employing three sets of warps and wefts, each set interlaces to form its own weave and create a distinct layer.
  • Tritik(Malay) patterning on woven cloth by sewing running stitch following a design and pulling the cloth tight. The stitches act as a resist when the cloth is dyed.
  • Tubular WarpSee circular warp.
  • TwillA basic weave structure characterized by warp or weft floats and the diagonal bindings of the warp- and weft-interlacing. There are many different types of twill (diamond twill, herringbone, etc.).
  • TwiningA weaving technique in which pairs of warps or wefts are twisted around wefts or warps respectively. In Indonesia, this is commonly encountered at the edges of textiles, where pairs of wefts have been twined around warps to finish the edge. The weaver crosses a pair of wefts above and below the warp, twists them to reverse their positions, then crosses them over the next warp. This can be done simply to strengthen an edge, but it is also possible to make decorative designs using elaborations of the twining technique. (Two) A weaving technique in which pairs of warps or wefts are twisted around wefts or warps respectively. In Indonesia, this is commonly encountered at the edges of textiles, where pairs of wefts have been twined around warps to finish the edge. The weaver crosses a pair of wefts above and below the warp, twists them to reverse their positions, then crosses them over the next warp. This can be done simply to strengthen an edge, but it is also possible to make decorative designs using elaborations of the twining technique.
  • Ulos(Batak) a traditional cloth.
  • VelvetA textile, normally made of silk, that is patterned using raised pile on the surface. The pile is made of loops of supplementary warps that are raised using metal rods inserted during weaving. The loops may later be cut to create plush or left uncut. Velvet piles can be of multiple heights depending on the metal rods used.
  • VermillionSee Cinnabar.
  • VOCVereenigde Oostindische Compagnie, the Dutch East India Company.
  • WarpThreads that are fixed on the loom prior to weaving. The warp threads make up the structure of a woven textile, into which the weft is inserted. In looms, warp threads run parallel and longitudinally.
  • Warp Axle/BeamThe beam of a loom that lies furthest from the weaver, to which the warp threads are attached or loop around. On some looms the warp threads are wound around this beam when weaving commences, being gradually unwound as the weaving progresses. On most horizontal looms the warp beam is the beam furthest from the weaver.
  • Warp-Faced Compound Plain WeaveA structure based on plain weave with multiple complementary warps that participate in the ground weave and two sets of wefts (ground/ foundation and inner). The inner wefts separate the warps that ride on the front of the fabric, making the pattern, versus those remaining on the back. Ancient Chinese jin textiles were woven using this structure.
  • Warp-Faced WeaveA weave in which the warp predominates on the surface of the textile. This is the default result on a loom that lacks a reed, in which (all other things being equal) the warps tend to be closely packed together. Warp-faced weaves, often decorated with warp ikat and warp patterning, predominate in the eastern parts of the Indonesian archipelago and Borneo.
  • Warp-Float PatterningSee supplementary warp.
  • Warp IkatSee ikat. In general, warp ikat is a warp-faced weave.